The Poison Conspiracy Antidote – Chapter 11 – Crucify Him! (Tamal Krishna Goswami) by Mayeśvara Dāsa ( ACBSP )

Some Were Curious, Some Were Crazy!

As the symptoms of Srila Prabhupada’s physical body began to impede on his ability to translate, all his disciples worldwide became more concerned about his longevity.    We had become so dependent on his guidance, inspiration, and Krishna Conscious nurturing that the thought of His Divine Grace leaving us was of great concern to every devotee in the Hare Krishna movement.  Many of us were requested to keep doing our daily duties.  Book distribution had to still go on, guests had to be greeted, feasts had to be cooked, deities had to be worshiped and the temples had to stay open.

Those who met Srila Prabhupada in the very early days of the late 1960’s had already established a very intimate relationship with him on a deep level many of us who came later never had the good fortune to experience.   We are all unique individuals and as the world learned about Srila Prabhupada, all sorts of characters showed up to see what he was doing.  Some were curious, some were serious, some left, some stayed, some got initiated, some fell down, some soared to the top and some were crazy.  Tamal Krishna was one of those who seemed to understand very quickly the concept of going after Krishna with the intense greed Ramananda Roy spoke about:

“‘Pure devotional service in Krsna consciousness cannot be had even by pious activity in hundreds and thousands of lives. It can be attained only by paying one price — that is, intense greed to obtain it. If it is available somewhere, one must purchase it without delay.'”- Madhya 8.70 read more

Shotgun Weddings: Indian-style The Editors

In 19th and early 20th century America, the term “shotgun wedding” connoted a man being forced at gun point (usually by a shotgun) to marry a young woman. What typically occasioned the marriage was that the man got the girl pregnant and had no intention of marrying her, and consequently her father or other family members stepped in to persuade him at gunpoint. At least that happened in the days when it was socially unacceptable for women to bear children out of wedlock.

So, with this bit of Americana by way of introduction, we present here an Indian version of it.* Because Indian society, especially rural society, is still for the most part deeply conservative, young men and women have far fewer opportunities to intermingle and for the unmarried girl to become pregnant. That means other incentives to bear the risk of coercing a groom into marriage come to the forefront. read more