Where is the Difficulty? Nataraja Dasa

About practice

Some may say, that:

“It is difficult to apply the laws of Manu in today’s world since the conditions that exist now are very different from those when they were formally codified.”

But it’s not really true – even if some laws we may not be able to apply, due to current law system – still there are plenty of principal laws, which we can definitely apply. In Bhagavad Gita is said, that better to imperfectly do what is your duty than perfectly what is not. The same is said in Manu Samhita itself – even if you are imperfect and conditions imperfect, better is to do what is your dharma and duties. read more

Dharma as a Consequentialism

In some recent public statements, Hridayananda Maharaja questions the authenticity of the well-known pastimes of Yudhisthira Maharaja having gambled away his wife Draupadi in a match rigged by Shakuni. He also questions the attempted disrobing of Draupadi in the assembly of the Kurus. Given that these pastimes have been accepted by Srila Prabhupada and by other acharyas in our line, Maharaja’s statements have caused considerable disturbance. This is not the first time Maharaja has made controversial public statements, nor is it likely to be his last. But what is not well known is what these recent statements have in common with other controversial acts and statements made by him over the years. They are products of a world view that places the moral philosophy of consequentialism above all other forms of Vedic authority. Maharaja’s radical application of consequentialism to Krishna consciousness is a form of adharma called abhasa, and it accounts for the deep differences between him and Srila Prabhupada on diverse subjects ranging from Vedic authority and culture to fundamental sexual ethics. Due to efforts over many years by Maharaja and others to propagate this, virtually without impediment, there are now many devotees whose understanding and practice of Krishna consciousness from the very beginning has been formed around adharmic principles.

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Who is Lord Karttikeya?

The appearance and universal position of Lord Karttikeya is described in the Mahabharata (Markandeya-samasya-parva, Salyaparva and Anusasana-parva). The following is a summary: After the marriage celebration of Lord Siva and Goddess Uma, they desired to beget a child. Thereupon all the demigods became filled with anxiety because the combined potency of Lord Siva and Goddess Uma, made invincible by penance, would surely produce an immensely powerful child who might become the cause of universal destruction.

When the celestial couple were in conjugal union, the demigods requested Siva to restrain his fiery semen and not beget offspring. As master of his senses, Siva agreed to the demigods’ request, but Goddess Uma cursed them: “Since you have opposed the birth of issue from me, you therefore shall have no offspring of your own!” After some time, the demigods were harassed by the powerful demon Taraka, who, by the blessings of Lord Brahma, could not be defeated either by demigods, raksasas, or humans.

They appealed to Lord Brahma for help, explaining their difficulty in fighting with Taraka and their inability, due to Uma’s curse, to create offspring capable of defeating that demon. Lord Brahma relieved their anxiety by advising them to ask Agni to procreate a male issue who would bring the demise of the asura Taraka. (Since Agni was not among the demigods who had interrupted Lord Siva’s and Goddess Uma’s attempt to conceive a child, he was the only demigod not cursed by Uma.) read more