How much is too much?

 Editor’s note: “Our farm projects are an extremely important part of our movement. We must become self-sufficient by growing our own grains and producing our own milk, then there will be no question of poverty. So develop these farm communities as far as possible. They should be developed as an ideal society depending on natural products, not industry. Industry has simply created Godlessness, because they think they can manufacture everything that they need. Our Bhagavad-gita philosophy explains that men and animals must have food in order to maintain their bodies. And the production of food is dependent on the rain, and the rain of course is dependent on chanting Hare Krsna. Ref. (SPL to Rupanuga, 18th December, 1974)

I’ve been doing rather a lot of manual labour recently—digging out a basement, digging out a pond and using the spoil from both to build a foundation for the poly tunnel on a sloping field. As I’m sure most of you know, doing work such as this is a great way to ponder things over: the body is occupied so the mind is free to roam. As such there are often thoughts drifting through my head that I try to file away mentally under the category ‘Possible blog topics’. Often, however, they are merely questions for which I have no answer.

One such thought occurred to me last week as I attempted to dig over a patch of turf and turn it into a small area for planting vegetables. Labouring away with a mattock, I first had to break the sod, then turn it over and break it up some more with a few more vigorous hacks. Then I had to bend over and pull out the various bits of grass and weeds before moving onto the next bit. When it was all done I had to break up the large clumps of soil and dig little trenches for the seedlings to sit in, and finally I had to put rabbit-proof fence around it and lay a slug trap (a plastic milk bottle, half full of beer, set into the soil). It was quite an effort, but by the end of six or so hours I had a nice patch of turned earth in which to plant some sweetcorn, peas, beans and turnips. read more

Mayapur – The Land – The Vision – 1969 to 1977 part 2

Value of the Land

Land in the dham should not be measured in terms of mundane monetary value. It is much more valuable than that. It is actually considered to be chintamani. Yet we are sometimes scolded that the land in Mayapur has so much monetary value that we cannot afford the luxury of creating simple housing, or dedicating some land to demonstrate simple living. This contention is not born out by Srila Prabhupada’s teaching however. When it comes to principles, he saw things from a completely different perspective.

In a BTG issue from 1952 Srila Prabhupada describes the birth right of each individual: read more

Mayapur – The Land – The Vision – 1969 to 1977 part 1

Acquiring the Land

In 1969/70 Srila Prabhupada attempted to purchase land in Mayapur, but there were some difficulties.

Tamal Krsna Maharaja relates one incident: “Prabhupada was searching for land in Mayapur. We had tried to go to look for land when we first came to Calcutta, but we couldn’t; the flood waters stopped us from crossing the Ganges to go. So Prabhupada said, “Maybe Lord Caitanya doesn’t want me to establish a temple in Mayapur.” read more