Glories & Importance Of Srila Prabhupada’s Books

As from wood, fire can be manifested, or as butter can be churned out of milk, so also the presence of the Lord as Paramatma can be felt by the process of legitimate hearing and chanting of the transcendental subjects which are especially treated in the Vedic literatures like the Upanisads and Vedanta. Srimad-Bhagavatam is the bona fide explanation of these Vedic literatures. The Lord can be realized through the aural reception of the transcendental message, and that is the only way to experience the transcendental subject. As fire is kindled from wood by another fire, the divine consciousness of man can similarly be kindled by another divine grace. His Divine Grace the spiritual master can kindle the spiritual fire from the woodlike living entity by imparting proper spiritual messages injected through the receptive ear. Therefore one is required to approach the proper spiritual master with receptive ears only, and thus divine existence is gradually realized. The difference between animality and humanity lies in this process only. A human being can hear properly, whereas an animal cannot. (SB 1.2.32)

“The teachings presented in this book are nondifferent from the Lord,” Prabhupada writes in the preface to Teachings of Lord Caitanya.

Srimad-Bhagavatam is essential for the serious candidate who wants to attain the stage of Bhismadeva at the end. The unique situation of Bhisma can be attained at the time of death even though Lord Krsna may not be personally present. His words of the Bhagavad-gita or Srimad-Bhagavatam are identical with the Lord. They are sound incarnations. . . . [Of nine items, the first item, hearing (sravanam), is the most important of all.]” (Bhag. 1.9.43, purport) read more

Srila Prabhupada’s mercy on Mad Mick

This is a story which proves that the mercy of Srila Prabhupada flows like the river Ganga, reaching those souls others cannot.

A few years ago, in a small village in County Roscommon, one of the most rural parts of Ireland, there lived a man by the name of Michael Henmore. He never married and at an early life became a hermit.

 He had few possessions except a cow, a horse and cart, and a small house that time had forgot. He lived without running water or electricity. Every few days he would journey to the nearest village to draw water from the well there. He spoke to no one, not even relations. He had an unkempt beard and wore old-style clothes. read more