Shotgun Weddings: Indian-style The Editors

In 19th and early 20th century America, the term “shotgun wedding” connoted a man being forced at gun point (usually by a shotgun) to marry a young woman. What typically occasioned the marriage was that the man got the girl pregnant and had no intention of marrying her, and consequently her father or other family members stepped in to persuade him at gunpoint. At least that happened in the days when it was socially unacceptable for women to bear children out of wedlock.

So, with this bit of Americana by way of introduction, we present here an Indian version of it.* Because Indian society, especially rural society, is still for the most part deeply conservative, young men and women have far fewer opportunities to intermingle and for the unmarried girl to become pregnant. That means other incentives to bear the risk of coercing a groom into marriage come to the forefront. read more

Horrible, unclean works meant to destroy the world

This is a short film sponsored by Elon Musk, founder of the SpaceX and Tesla companies. It is a fictional depiction of what technology is likely to produce in the not so distant future. The point is valid that all the technologies for such a thing to come about exist. All someone has to do is integrate them.

Hence, Lord Kṛṣṇa’s declaration that the demons “engage in unbeneficial, horrible works meant to destroy the world.” This is a consequence of their belief that “this world is unreal, with no foundation, no God in control,” says Kṛṣṇa. “They say it is produced of sex desire and has no cause other than lust.” (BG 16.8). Thus, secularism and the idea that religion should not guide society gives rise to these awful things. read more

Avoiding Scandal: The Case for Gender Segregation in Society

There is a wave of incrimination in the United States against powerful men in politics and the entertainment industry and who are being publicly accused in very large numbers of being raped and molested.

But then something that no one could have predicted happened. It was a pre-Twitter, pre-internet, highly analog version of #MeToo. To the surprise of millions of men, the nation turned out to be full of women—of all political stripes and socioeconomic backgrounds—who’d had to put up with Hell at work. Mothers, sisters, aunts, girlfriends, wives—millions of women shared the experience of having to wait tables, draw blood, argue cases, make sales, all while fending off the groping, the joking, the sexual pressuring, and the threatening of male bosses. They were liberal and conservative; white collar and pink collar; black and white and Hispanic and Asian. Their common experience was not political, economic, or racial. Their common experience was female.

Caitlin Flanagan, “Bill Clinton: A Reckoning”, 13 Nov. 2017, The Atlantic, 14 Nov. 2017 <https://www.theatlantic.com/. . .> read more

Topless Female Protesters: The Victims are the Victimisers

Topless

Recently someone asked about whether calling out someone as sinful is also a sin? Although it seems absolutely necessary that criminals be identified as such, according to the Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam (1.17.22), those who identify criminals are just as guilty of the crime as criminals themselves.  Here is the verse:

rājovāca
dharmaṁ bravīṣi dharma-jña dharmo ’si vṛṣa-rūpa-dhṛk
yad adharma-kṛtaḥ sthānaṁ  sūcakasyāpi tad bhavet

“The King said: O you, who are in the form of a bull! You know the truth of religion, and you are speaking according to the principle that the destination intended for the perpetrator of irreligious acts is also intended for one who identifies the perpetrator. You are no other than the personality of religion.” read more